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Archive for the ‘Casablanca’ Category

Silva Ferretti, consultant to our project,  and facilitator of the two workshops for the AIM Standing Team, gave an online presentation in February 2012 to share her innovative approach to share knowledge and learning. This approach is using mediums other than written reports. Silva prefers that her evaluations (of trainings or programs) and other types of “reports” are portrayed in a more appealing way.

The following are the different types of mediums Silva discussed. You will recognize a few from the workshops with Silva.

  1. Blog through WordPress to summarize daily activities for a later evaluation of the activity (a workshop, for example)
  2. Photos and Videos
  • Participatory activity is better documented by photography, such as through a powerpoint presentation, or video. For example, Silva showed her Powerpoint using photography that documents the process of a vulnerability analysis.
  • For a Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices analysis, Silva, as the consultant, prefers to use photo and video to document the analysis with the community. Using this medium promotes ownership by the community.
  • Video is Silva’s preferred medium to capture people’s reflections, opinions, and explanations, such as beneficiaries’ feedback or staff’s explanation of an activity or approach.
  • Use 1-2 minute clips to capture learning from workshop participants when the learning happens
  • A video can portray emotion and a picture is worth a thousand words!
  • use Youtube to post the video
  1. Prezi is a free downloadable presentation software that presents information in one screen and allows the reader to zoom in to different parts. A prezi presentation allows the reader to see the creator’s structure of thinking behind the presentation of information which is not possible in a linear report. Silver showed an evaluation she did, which includes all the regular parts of a report. This prezi presentation also includes an embedded video of a staff person explaining a program component!
  2. Google Doc to conduct an online survey and get results quickly.
  3. Animation using xtranormal software allows you to create characters to act out a skit (which always turns out funny). Animation can be used to depict a sensitive or controversial topic when there is no real voice to do so, such as problems in a program found through an evaluation. Have you seen the cowboy video created by ___ during the first Standing Team workshop in Bangkok? Not only was this video super fun to watch, it sparked a great discussion of the importance of high quality evaluations.
  4. Diagrams, flow charts, and maps can be used to break down and present a big idea, problem or concept in a visual way. There are tools online to do mind mapping, problem solving, flow chart diagramming.

Advantages to these alternative mediums of sharing knowledge and learning:

  • They are interesting, fun and cool!
  • They can spark an interesting discussion among participants.
  • These mediums are more likely to be given attention than written reports.
  • The images are memorable.
  • Using these mediums is at no cost.
  • They only requires a computer and internet.
  • Presenting knowledge through these mediums allows participants to work together in a different and fun way.

Serious can be Cool too!

Silva believes that just because the content (like an impact evaluation) is serious doesn’t mean it can’t be presented in a more interesting way. She explained that she is trying to overcome the “report wall” whereby many in the field, including big donors and report commissioners, prefer a “proper” written report over the alternative mediums of presentation of information, such as video, diagrams and infographics. Silva and the participants in the online presentation discussed the challenges of getting big donors and report commissioners to accept these new formats.

Which medium do you prefer?

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Some time for ourselves… to look back at what we did and what we learned.

A questionnaire to fill in.

And then, setting in a circle, we share our learning and our funniest memories from the workshop.

  • Tabulation/analysis matrix
  • Workshop facilitation
  • How to organize reports and gear them toward different audiences
  • Making new friends
  • Eating new kinds of food
  • Digging deeper into roles and responsibilities and each step of an evaluation process

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A video from the previous ECB workshop in Jakarta.

Sajilu –  Design, Monitoring & Evaluation Advisor, World Vision Zambia – reminds us why it is important to advocate for sharing learning with communities

 

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Monday07 Nov(afternoon) Setting the ground

Tuesday08 Nov Standards, stakeholders, tools

Tea break

Lunch

Tea break

Wednesday 09 Nov Scenario

Thursday10 Nov Sharing findings, learning and bringing it all together

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  1. How can we share JE learning broadly? How can we make sure the learning is relevant to other actors, such as the UN and beyond? What is ECB’s role in that sharing of learning?
  2. Should the programme manager for the project being evaluated accompany the evaluation team?
  3. Who decided to do a joint evaluation?
  4. Is there budget in ECB years 4 and 5 for joint evaluations?
  5. What are the basic elements of a good TOR?
  6. Please share your tips on planning and preparation for data collection!
  7. How do you effectively draw conclusions and recommendations from your data?
  8. If a joint evaluation is a good practice, why not start your joint activities much earlier and start with a joint needs assessment at the start and promote joint activities and coordination throughout the emergency?

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